J. D. Salinger

Jerome David J.D. Salinger (January 1, 1919 – January 27, 2010) was an American writer who won acclaim early in life. He led a very private life for more than a half-century. He published his final original work in 1965 and gave his last interview in 1980. Salinger was raised in Manhattan and began writing short stories while in secondary school. Several were published in Story magazine in the early 1940s before he began serving in World War II. In 1948, his critically acclaimed story A Perfect Day for Bananafish appeared in The New Yorker magazine, which became home to much of his later work. In 1951, his novel The Catcher in the Rye was an immediate popular success. His depiction of adolescent alienation and loss of innocence in the protagonist Holden Caulfield was influential, especially among adolescent readers. The novel remains widely read and controversial, selling around 250,000 copies a year.






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The Catcher in the Rye

J. D. Salinger - Publisher : Little, Brown and Company

Since his debut in 1951 as The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield has been synonymous with cynical adolescent. Holden narrates the story of a couple of days in his sixteen-year-old life, just after he's been expelled from prep school, in a slang that sounds edgy even today and keeps this novel on banned book lists. His constant wry observations about what he encounters, from teachers to phonies...
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In the metro, train, bus

Spring

To my children

enough easy to read

Great classic

Less than 10$

A few days






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